FTY: Tests? We don’t like tests!

June 27, 2014

Current Reading and commentary:

  1. A Peoples History of the US: Ch11- Robber Barrons and Rebels——>So many parallels to The Pitchforks Are Coming….For Us Plutocrats. The man who writes that article is very smart to realize we have been here before and blood was spilled. I would really like to know how much. I think I might go through Mr. Zinn’s Ch11 and record a body count and dates, because I want to know how many died so my family could have the weekend, the 8 hour day, and the minimum wage. Agitation with A Smile 🙂
  2. Hands on the Freedom Plow- My sub-title: Revolutionary women who lead the civil rights movement and their stories.
  3. GRE Exam Math Workbook- a few of my answers have been thrown off by ONE digit—-and no point/ cookie for me–even though I got the process right!!!!!!!! Fairness does not exist.
  4. Grammar for College Writing: I’ts like 8th grade english plus, all over again—– without the sentence diagramming.
  5. A Workbook for Argument: A Complete Course in Critical Thinking–I’m working on my writing so I can write a killer op-ed.

fridaythankyou

 

FTY: To Stephanie Lormand (and of course The Labor Movement) An unlikely pair to be so close together

 

 

🙂 My dear friend Stephanie Lormand had a wonderful op-ed in the News and Observer this week you can find a link to it in this blog post called Are School Aged Kids Tested More Often than Toxic Chemicals. Her op-ed was very inspiring to me. I hope one day I can write an op-ed about an issue I am passionate about.

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STY: Book Switch- Freedom’s Teacher

June 30, 2012

Saturday Thank YouIn honor of the Labor Movement “The folks who brought you The Weekend!”

I read several chapters into The Woman Behind The New Deal and had to return it. In reading that book I realized I’m more of a “boots on the ground” organizer, like Frances Perkins was early on in her career. And that probably has more to do with my need for movement and a variety of different activities. So, I have switched books. I’ve only just begun this book but I find myself needing to go back and reread because I can’t believe the history I’m seeing repeat; and it’s good to know that “The Women’s Liberation Movement” was alive and well prior to the Civil Rights movement—we just don’t get to hear about it unless we seek it out. I plan on posting more about what I am reading next week.

chaotic note

I’ve got a great story for Warrior Wednesday inspired by Kiddo–who asked where are the women warriors. Thank You Master Ray for telling the story about why most men would choose to fight other men and not women who were defending their children and home. <Ohh wee! when my kitchen gets messed up after I worked so hard to clean it–watch out>

Great story about Reclaiming Our History and Finding the real Rebel Helen Keller


FTY: Dont Know Mind and Questioning

June 21, 2012

Today’s Friday Thank You goes out to Teachers and Parents.

Two things my family is working on is asking each other more questions and embracing.. don’t know mind or beginners mind.  By embracing don’t know mind we shed our perceptions and biases of what we think should be. It is very similar to letting go of expectations–as the 12 step programs say.

Using questioning with the 4-6 year old age group has been difficult for me to embrace. I have noticed a remarkable improvement in kiddo’s behavior since I embraced it. I’m used to giving choices and being open to children’s suggestions with the elementary school age group and not preschool. I’ve had to let go of the idea that I’m The Adult and my kiddo should just do what I say. It also brings up uncomfortable feelings about cultural differences. I must say my thoughts have fluctuated between thinking– Yes, ma’am and Yes, Sir seem a little rigid—but at the same time it makes sense to me. I particularly like asking a question and if the answer is no telling kiddo, “The answer is Yes ma’am”.<—this is me embracing the paradox of it all>

Also, not every family gives children choices. So, what happens when I give a student choices and it overwhelms them. This is a particularly sticky question I’ve been asked as a ‘White Teacher‘. And, I haven’t found an answer I am completely comfortable with yet. I think I would look to veteran teachers around me to help me with children uncomfortable with making choices.

Through some reflection my husband and I noticed that we weren’t even asking each other questions regularly. I also realized that I wasn’t asking him questions because I thought I already knew what his answer would be.<Silly, silly thoughts.>

Some of my other thoughts on questions are that I need to question myself more. So far I compiled these 5 questions <I can’t remember where I found them>

5 mindful expressions/ questions< I’m sure they are similar to ones in 5 Questions that help us wake up.
1. I don’t know.
2. I was wrong.
3. I made a mistake.
4. It happens.
5. How can I help?

chaotic notes

As I’ve been trying to keep the house and other things cleaner recently, I find this as an area where I cannot control my tone of voice. It’s hard not to get exasperated when kiddo brings in a large bucket with the bottom coated in mud. Now as I write this I see that she is only following my example of having a little glass jar with moss growing in it to show her what an ecosystem is. It’s very similar to these jars but I reused an old spaghetti sauce jar. I realize the reason I gave up trying to have a neat house is that it causes me great aggravation to have to continually pick up things, instead I’m really trying to see the clutter as a reminder that people I love live here and I do appreciate their presence.

My Moss Jar Experiment


FTY: The Lady With The New Deal

June 15, 2012

I need to make a mental note that yesterday and today were challenging to say the least. Good, yet challenging. I got to see a wonderful friend two days in a row. And I didn’t have to deal with a hot mess of crazy woman “you two were hanging out but didn’t invite me”.

Random Question: Why is it the women I hang out with tend to be dude-like? Oh, right it must be the increased and joyous participation in spontaneity <–thank you spell check> “disorder” that I have.

So, I’m on page 142 of the book from last Friday’s post <The Woman Behind the New Deal>. I took over a page of notes on the beginning, which gives you the scenario of what society looked like/ felt like prior to the New Deal. And, Lemme tell you, it was very different than now. < I probably use then/ than incorrectly > <Perhaps this points to a learning disability rather than white trashiness! >

This quote shocked me….

p.2

“The eight hour day was a standard plank of the Socialist Party; unemployment insurance seemed laughably improbable; direct aid to the unemployed would threaten his campaign pledge of a balanced budget. He said he would back her.”

chaotic note

But Really what the heck is up with this?


FTY: Socialist Party of 1930

June 8, 2012

I really like the 8 hour workday–I think this makes me a socialist! Again, I continue to be shocked by women throughout history that I was never taught about- Thank goodness I go to the library. <Library should be a verb. There probably is a verbacious version of library but I’m to (or too?) uneducated to know about it.> Its an actively shocking experience for me this library. I will be obsessively reading about Frances Perkins (book title below) and baking this weekend. I’m also plotting my New Deal 😉

chaotic note

 

The chaotic note in this post has become very significant recently.

Organize, agitate, educate, must be our war cry.
Susan B. Anthony


FTY: Papa Carl’s Navy Uniform

June 1, 2012

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yesterday, Moshi and I went to the NC General Assembly. First thing I notice is the two Gigantic Ladies in the seal right outside of the Legislative Building.

I like NC’s motto:

“Esse Quam Videri”

Our State’s motto was adopted by the General Assembly in 1893. The Latin words “Esse Quam Videri” mean “to be rather than to seem.” The origin of these words is found in Cicero’s essay on Friendship (Cicero de Amicitia, Chapter 26).

I’m doing my best to make sure NC lawmakers are compassionate when it comes to issues affecting women and children, which is why I was letting Moshie wear her Great-Grandfather’s WWII Navy Uniform. I told her she was a Navy mail carrier and her job was to pass out mail to the legislative assistants.

She did great. We even got to work on our number places, since we were on the second floor we practised matching numbers in the 2000’s.Check out this story about our work in The Voter Update.


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